October 22nd- National Day Of Protest Against Police Brutality

Warning sign for police brutality.

Warning sign for police brutality. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Today is an important political day for numerous reasons. In addition to the last presidential debate, October 22nd is a day of protest against the deep rooted problem of police brutality. The October 22nd coalition began in 1996, and has continued to highlight  incidents of police brutality, high-profile or not. A sad testament to this ongoing issue, is the Stolen Lives Project. It is a book listing 2000 names of people who were killed by law enforcement.

As time has passed, the coalition has taken more firm stands. Namely, in terms of Stop and Frisk and Mass Incarceration. In a recent statement in support of the day of protest, activist Carl Dix cites well known yet nonetheless disturbing statistics. “Close to 2.4 million people are warehoused in prisons in the U.S.” said Dix. Mass incarceration has become part of the lexicon of the activist community to describe the process of increased imprisonment for even non violent offenses. So pervasive is it’s negative impact on Black life in America, that it is referred to as “The New Jim Crow”

This predicament among others need not be pushed under the rug, whether official electoral politics will deal with it or not. To find out more about this day of protest, visit the webpage of the October 22nd coalition.

Marc W. Polite

 

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  • http://www.facebook.com/glenn.berman Glenn Berman

    Just wondering is there a Day for all the police officers that are killed or maimed in the line of duty, I knew an officer Cecil Frank Sledge who was shot and dragged by the car he pulled over he was only Age: 35
    Tour: 12 years
    Badge # 4438
    Cause: Gunfire
    Incident Date: 1/28/1980
    Weapon: Handgun; .38 caliber
    Suspect: Sentenced to 25 years to life

    Read more: http://www.odmp.org/officer/12348-police-officer-cecil-frank-sledge#ixzz2A4UZy6fc

    Officer Cecil Frank sledge was a hero in the community he patrolled, were is his day and the many fallen officers like him.

    http://www.odmp.org/officer/12348-police-officer-cecil-frank-sledge

    • http://www.politeonsociety.com Marc

      Actually Glenn, there is a national law enforcement memorial based in Washington D.C. to commemorate all of the officers killed in the line of duty. Here is the link for that organization. NLEOMF

      Now with that question out of the way, I wonder why you would raise this in a post about police brutality. It wouldn’t be to point away from the wrongdoings of law enforcement that the October 22nd Coalition is focusing on, would it?

  • o22national

    People inevitably bring up how dangerous it is to be a police officer whenever the topic of police brutality and killing by law enforcement comes up. However, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, year after year, the reality is quite different. Retail workers, for example, have a much greater chance of being killed on the job than cops.

    Here’s the most recent data: http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/cfoi.pdf

    And in fact, if you go to those “Officer Down”-type websites, you’ll find that a very large percentage of law enforcement who die in the line of duty die from accidents. I just counted out of 100 officers listed at ODMP, 39 died either of heart attacks, falls, or vehicular accidents.

    When you compare this data to the Stolen Lives book (and its follow-ups) referenced above, it becomes clear that the brutality visited by the police upon communities across the US, particularly communities of color, is incredibly one-sided. Yet police and their apologists like to repeat the myth that their jobs are so dangerous, because it serves at least two purposes: It covers over their own brutality by promoting the factually false notion that they’re “putting their lives on the line,” and it promotes the idea that the communities that they routinely brutalize are inherently violent and in need of an iron fist to keep them under control.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/glenn.berman Glenn Berman

    Officers this year 101 website, below.
    http://www.odmp.org/search/year

    In New York there are about 34000 Officers serving a 8-10 million population, when an officer is accused of anything it is taken very seriously if you wish to believe that or not, and at the end of the day an officer wants nothing more than to go home an be with his or her family, officers are just people like you and me, and if there is a few that step over the line they are dealt with harshly. Generally when officers make an arrest the alleged criminal will show resistance, the officer has the authority given to them by it’s citizens to subdue with whatever force deemed necessary. The officers are not there to pass judgement, only to make the arrest and let the system do the rest. If you are interested you can take the “Police Academy Civilian training program” just step into your local precinct and speak to the community affairs officer http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/community_affairs/community_participation_programs.shtml .

    It’s one evening a week for 14 weeks, you will get a snapshot of what it takes to be an officer and the many positive things they do to keep our city safe and a better place to live.

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